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think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consum
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. there are tragedies in life that shake our souls and break our hearts. today the nation experienced one of those tragedies. every american will struggle to come to grips with what happened today in a small community in connecticut. sandy hook elementary school in the small community of about 27,000 residents was the site of a shooting rampage. at this hour we know 26 people at the school were shot and killed by a lone gunman. 20 of those deceased were children. surviving students and their parents said teachers ordered children to hide in closets. witnesses reported hearing dozens of shots, as many as 100 rounds. police found the shooter dead. officers never fired a shot. the gunman's mother was found dead at a newtown location where the gunman lived. police have released no motive for the attack. the weapons used in the shooting were all legally purchased and were registered to the gunman's mother. an emotional president obama addressed the nation this afternoon from the white house. >> we've endured too many o
and seen he was right. back to you in new york. >> peter, before you go there was a report by another media outlet in the 10:00 hour last night that they were calling the parents in to identify the bodies of their children. have you heard that? >> the reports we have heard are that the police set up a makeshift morgue inside the school and they photographed all of the children around they were showing the parents photographs of their children to identify them. >> okay. >> they want to reconstruct what happened and it's a pain staking process. they are only going to have one shot at it to find out what took place. who is the suspect? >> he did it. he is the shooter. >> he is adam lanza. he is 20-years old. we do know this, it seems he is thought to be by neighbors by family members either mildly autistic or a little bit some what off they say. according to one of his former classmates and who happens to be a neighbor timothy dalton, as horrible as this was, i can't say i am surprised. burn in hell adam. >> and yet there are lots of conflicting reports at this point about who he is. his broth
in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks, michael age 13 from long island, new york. >> free medical care for everyone, dorothy, age 72, new york, new york. >> i wish for all of the lonely people in the world to find happiness. daniel, steele, the author. >> i wish that we could bring all of our soldiers home now, anonomous. >> thank you, everyone. >> you can't make that stuff up, i tell you that was incredible, i know when the mayor leaves town they appoint a mayor for the day and i think that hannah should be the supervisor for the day when scott is out of town, thank you, hannah. >> okay, if you are following your program, throw it away or take it home with you so you know who was here today but he always have to change things around a little bit. i am thrilled that we have the mayor with us and we have the council general of japan with us and i want to bring them on so they can do the official thing that they have done for several years and exchange oragami decorations and kind of a symbolic friendship act here in city hall and don't forget that san francisco is
going back to the front. they called this bad behavior and as "the new york times", which by the way seems to be calling our programs each time, last time they did pain, now they are dos post traumatic stress disorder, they must be watching what is happening on charlie rose. >> re: they could do worse. >> they could do a lot worse. (laughter) >> so they pointed out that veterans from the vietnam war suffer a double hurt. first of all they have the disease, the post traumatic stress disorder but in addition because many of them were thought to be malingerers, bad behavior they did not get an honorable discharge. this is no longer the case. this is now considered a legitimate category and people who suffer from it are treated appropriately. and one of the reasons it is a legitimate category is because in addition to having a good clinical definition we are beginning to have some biological markers of it. we know a little bit about the genetics. so we know from imaging experiments this of what we will discuss here that there are three areas in particular that are involved in post trauma
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perhaps the only p
off at school. he told the "new york post", he went into the school happily. he planned to return later in the afternoon and had plans to make gingerbread houses that day. watching his son running into the building was the last time he ever saw him. the son loved animals, math and was very happy little boy. we're also hearing stories of bravery. several staff members at the school reportedly sacrificed themselves to save their lives as many students as they could. including in that the amazing story of principal dawn huxburn. colleagues say she never hesitated. she ran straight for the gunman and that move ended up costing her life. her friend a library clerk says her death will be devastating to the community. >> we had a book fair a few weeks ago. she was reading fairy and went around the classroom and she was an amazing woman. she was strong and fun. the kids loved her. she was really wonderful woman. it's a huge loss. when you think about how the school and leadership she was the person that most could have done that. >> jamie: clearly she loved that school so much. she is als
-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions in the white house, and in every case, he really always brought deeply moral and intellectual realm into the work he was doing in
of new york city. it's near danbury, connecticut. the young man who police say was the shooter reportedly walked into two different classrooms at sandy hook elementary. he fired dozens of rounds. he killed 26 people. 18 children pronounced dead at the scene. six adults pronounced dead at the scene. and then two children who survived their initial wounds and were hospitalized later died in hospital. the shooter then killed himself at the school. the associated press is citing a law enforcement official moments ago saying authorities found more than the previously described two guns at the school once they responded. more firearms than the two we have previously heard about. they're not giving any further details yet. but that report just in from the associated press. the students who were not shot, none of them older than fourth graders, were escorted out of the building by police officers this morning. they were taken to a fire station next door. police officers reportedly told some of the children to keep their eyes closed until they had reached the parking lot. law enforcement officials
much with nothing to do with sandy. adam: let's reverse it. let's go to new york city. i saw better itry tunnel fill with water. mta swallowed 4 to $5 billion unexpected cost to get trains up and running. the money has to come from somewhere. it is appropriate in a disaster like this to turn to the federal government. are these things covered in this bill or is that money squandered? >> there is money for the federal transit administration which would help mta. there is money in here for the disaster relief fund which will help people in is disaster and future disasters. this will help the flood program because borrowing will have to increase by billions of dollars with this underwater program. there are things that are important and critical and legitimate. the problem there is so much other garbage thrown in here and things n necessary, that it just feeds the voter cynicism as you're talking about. adam: with 40 seconds left does it pass? i never known a bill congress didn't like that they put money into the pockets they could disperse. >> there is good chance it will pass the sen
. before we get started let's look at the coverage of the tabloids here in new york city. america weeps. there is the president of the united states. he shed a couple of tears in the briefing room yesterday. slaughter of the innocence. and a picture you saw a lot of yesterday from the beup in newtown yesterday where a police officer leads those children single file out of sandy hook school. >> so many horrific elements to this story but i think the worst for me is the fact that there are 20 kids dead between the ages of 5 and 10 years old and as we learn more about the shooter, it seems as though there were clues he was capable of doing this. >> there will be an update at 8:00 this morning with the authorities. >> all right. peter doocy meanwhile is live in sandy hook for us with the very latest details. good morning, peter. tell us what you have learned overnight. >> alisyn, we learned that the medical examiner's office has been working all night long inside sandy hook elementary school. they are trying to have the 20 children and six adults who were murdered inside yesterday during sc
. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. hi, neighbor! my grandpere is coming over to visit for thank you day. yay! and then we're going to have a thank you day party! thank you for coming over to play today. i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting,
absiddian church of new york where he succeeded his father as pastor and was the first black from new york to serve in the u.s. congress, and got over 67 bills passed through congress including title seven, head start, national student loan program, but that preacher dr. butts had lifts us to the seventh heaven with his oratory and after the service was over as i followed the platform party out to the foyer of that great cathedral there i looked up and i beheld a beautiful quilt at the center of many other quilts that the quilting ministry of friendship church had put on display, and when i saw that quilt that caught my eye i said to the pastor "dr. clifford jones, i want that quilt. i want that quilt ." dr. jones says "it's yours". when he took me to the car the limousine was there waiting for me and before i close the door i looked at him again and i said "dr. jones i want that quilt". he said "i told you it's yours. i will have my secretary mail it to you .". two weeks later package appeared in my office. my secretary pearl said "here's a package here for you". i looked and saw i
. newtown, 60 miles from new york city, a commuter town in many ways, to the big city of manhattan, but a community all its own, a small community that many of us probably didn't know too much about yesterday until we got the news of the shooting and exactly what happened at sandy hook elementary school. at this point we probably all feel a little bit connected to this community. it's something that the president talked about yesterday and the president getting very emotional while making a statement at the white house saying we've endured too many of these incidents over the last few years and every time he learns the news he reacts not as a president, but as a parent. let's listen to the president. >> i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages and five and ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of gone, among the fallen were teachers, men and women who devoted their lives helping ho
responders i am sure that was horrific. 10 day i saw and largest mass murder in new york history before 9/11. that is burned in my brain. i can just imagine what this was. how come there was no survivors. this punk. probably shot them in the head and if he shot body shots, we would have had a lot more survivors. >> doctor, you have seen many. ni did the autopsies on those. >> you have seen a lot. how do you kind of, i guess it is like any job, you have to find a way to compartmentalize what you are witnessing or you don't survive. >> in a sense, the deceedents are out of the pain and misery. it is it the partners and families. they are going through a state that will last a few days until they get their babies back. the sivenadults will be autopsied especially the perpetrator. but the children have to be examined and they have document the injuries on the children and if there are bullets in the bodies they have to be removed. to match it up to the weapons and make sure there was not a weapon they don't know about. it takes time. >> it comes back. and i have been involved with this safe s
. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factory. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our client through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's o
're about 60 miles northeast of new york city. welcome to "cbs this morning saturday." we are in newtown, connecticut, just a short ways away from the school where a gunman slaughtered 20 young children and adults yesterday morning before taking his own life. the firehouse behind us was a gathering place for terrified parents who rushed to the scene after learning of the attack. >> it was the second worst mass killing in u.s. history after the virginia tech shootings in 2007, but the depths of the what is sure to be many signs of a community coming together. we've learned that all of the dead have been identified of authorities with the help of pictures provided by grieving parents and family members. the bodies havy it to be removed from the school which remains a crime scene. >> and here in newtown, the is impossible to exaggerate and jeff glor has more on that. jeff good morning. >> reporter: rebecca, good morning to you. we may never know why the shooter did what he did, but people here are trying to understand, and they are struggling. >> all those families
. back in new york where tom was a runner, for july, he had been in competition with broderick and when he came west to make his fortune he basically wanted to be a senator. that was his plan and he became a senator and tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the world's ugliest man, heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. i got to write this. as i am working i realize we are very close, tom sawyer actually match mark twain 1863 about three blocks from here, the old building, in a steam room, and mark twain liked to talk to tom. they played cards and drank beer and played dice. that was the genesis of it. this has got to be written. all these years of finding little bits of pieces of diaries and stuff. this is the results. i took out 40,000 words. can you imagine? that is how i overshot the mark. i do love it. is fun. and i guess i could reduce some now if you like. it may take a second. i have never read in public before. i will start with a quote from tom sawyer and this is an interview with viola rogers. i have to read this. yo
, upstate new york. if by some fluke you had the ear of governor cuomo regarding the potential for hydrofracking and the decision that he is facing, what might you say to him? >> i would certainly say to look at the example of pennsylvania which has created many, many jobs through hydrofracturing, is doing very well this that regard, and they haven't experienced environmental problems. and with new york's budget deficit, it seems obvious that hydrofracking is the way to go. and, of course, governor you mow is set -- cuomo is free to set whatever regulations he wants around that to insure the safety of water quality and other things that residents are concerned about. but i would say that the project should proceed. it's brought benefit to other states. there's no reason that new york should be left behind. >> okay. questions? yeah, right in front. wait for the microphone. >> paul lintos. i wanted to ask you, you gave very good examples of unsuccessful creation of new green jobs. have you also looked at elimination of existing jobs? >> the cost benefit analysis for mercury was a
's leave like they do in new york the machine on the ground, and then you reuse it later on. you don't have to do anything. you do that, everything will be cool. [laughter] >>> do you understand what i mean? north beach, lot of the little business in north beach are going to go broke. i'm not going to go broke. i've been there for 42 years. the business already, they're feeling already. you go at 2 o'clock in the morning you have roaches this long on the sidewalks and they go inside the businesses. you've got to think about it. i know it's a big project. i know a lot of people are involved. big money involved. you cannot look back. you leave the machine there and everybody will be happy. and then you -- next 10 years from now, god bless, you can go to saucelido. [laughter] >>> you understand that? leave the machines in the ground like they do in new york. don't come with the machines so long, this, we cannot do this. you are doing a project for $1,700,000. machine is only $11 million. that is reusable. in new york they use the machine there for 18 years. i have nothing else to say. but we a
tourists than any other city in america, especially this time of year. welcome to the big apple -- new york city. so, if your family's visiting for the holidays, here are some great things you can see and do. let's start at the top. you just can't beat the views from the observation deck of the empire state building. if you like to skate, the ice is nice at wollman's rink in central park. here's one tourist attraction that's good enough to eat. serendipity has fun food and its famous frozen hot chocolate. [ chuckling ] yum. new york is the theater capital of the world. a hot ticket is the christmas spectacular at radio city music hall. but one of the best shows in town is free -- the fantastic holiday windows, like these at ralph lauren. they draw lots of oohs and ahhs. >> look at that. [ gasps ] >> look at the dress. it's so pretty. >> and they draw you into the store, as well. how could i resist? they're all gifts, i promise. and of course, there's the giant tree at rockefeller center. so, let's recap. if you're visiting new york city this time of year, there's lots of fun things to do wh
's and dwayne reed's in new york are things of beauty and among my favorite places to shop and those who watch "squawk on the street" know i like to shop. i go to my dwayne reed's twice a week and the store manager tom does a great job. my inclination is this is a buy on any weakness and if it weren't for the gigantic acquisition i would say don't wait for the weakness. it's got a bright future ahead of it. beyond earnings monday the empire state manufacturing report from new york. in full-blown weak data mode want to see if business is rolling over. so the empire manufacturing number will set the tone for the rest of the day for things that ge doesn't cover. the fed told us businesses are ratcheting down spending. this is what we could hear. here's the bottom line. it's time to get used to the idea that we're going over the fiscal cliff. ready yourself to take a big hit in a couple weeks. but don't forget that individual companies still matter. if you really like one of these companies, i'm going to suggest buy half and then wait to see if we go over the cliff and buy the rest. let's go to te
of newtown, connecticut, 60 miles outside of new york city right now working through it together. ali? >> reporter: one of the things that's going to happen, we are going to hear the names. there's a lot of effort to find out who the victims were. police are saying very clearly, this was a real difficult task to identify. they had tentative identifications on everybody by last night. they wanted positive identifications and were not going to let their kids, they were not going to let the parents into the school to see their kids in that situation. so we are waiting for that momentarily. the parents know who their kids are, obviously, the children didn't come home last night. the bodies are still in the building, and that's an active crime scene, but there's also another active crime scene in this city, john. >> reporter: the one name police already released is adam lanza. he carried out the attack on the elementary school. when they arrived at his home, they made a startling discovery. mary snow is at lanza's home. mary, what did police find there? >> reporter: john, police found the
's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing to press for meaningful actions to prevent more incidents. our first call for the morning comes from new york on the line for independence. a teacher. good morning. caller: good morning. yes, i was a substitute teacher actually up an east strasbourg it. i can tell you that the respect and all of that that was a round what i was going to school is completely gone. i could not believe some of the things i got to see, and i was in middle school. these are still young the kids, 13 and 14 and 15 year olds. there is just no respect. i do not know whether it comes from the home or what. these kids are totally unmotivated in school. they have no respect for the teachers, no respect for authority. you know, it is the whole country and the whole world. we live a in a sec, evil, and perverted society and nobody want
was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases and earlier in 2008i started the mortgage fraud group that was targeting, you know, those types of cases that really helped lead to the financial crisis, major fraud in the mortgage finance system. so after the t.a.r.p. bill was passed, congress enacted this marble piece of legislation, they included within this new agency called the office of the specialized sector general for the trouble as a relief program. this incredibly great, you know, washington is the city of acronyms, and hours. the call went out to the different offices around the country looking for someone who had experience in mortgage fraud and securities fraud. i had that experience, so i was nominated by my boss who was the u.s. attorney, and it was sort of this crazy world wind of six weeks from when he had that conversation with me when i was actually confirmed and started serving as the special inspector general. >> was the date that you started? >> december 15th, 2008. >> what
,000 people fairly well to do miles northeast of the new york city. what can you tell us about the community and what you know from your nieces and nefews. >>> sean, thanks, it is a great town here. i can't stop thinking about last night, last night sandy hook elementary had a holiday concert that i attended. my niece was part of the choir and i think back to the hundred kids on the stage and their familis and sibblings running throughout the auditorium and 12 hours later this tragedy occurred. >>> yeah. >>> obviously, have you spoken to any other people in town and stories that we have been hearing including the custodian and a teacher on tape that i will show in a second and the lengths that people went to protect the children was amazing. >>> it was incredible. i know one of my nieces was in the library. and they werushered boo a closest to protect them. my sister did something which i don't think i could have done. she was on the way to the school and there were five or four boys all in first grade running up quite a distance from the fire house and she stopped and picked them up and not
miles northeast of new york city. what can you tell us about the community? what you know from your nieces and nephews? >> well, sean, thank you. you're correct. it's a great town, and i can't stop thinking about actually last night, last night sandy hook elementary school had the holiday concert a tended. my teenagers were part of the choir. and innocence, i go back to families on the stage and siblings running throughout the auditorium, 12 hours later the tragedy occurred. >> yes. and have you spoken to any of the other people in town? any other stories we've been hearing including the custodian? we have a teacher on tape i'll show in just a moment. the lengths to which people went to protect these children it was pretty amazing. >> it was incredible. i know one of my nieces was in the library. and they were ushered into a closet to protect them. my sister did something which i don't think coy have done. she was on her way to the school and there are five, four boy boys and a girl in first grade running up the street. and she stopped and picked them up, not knowing what is going o
town about 60 miles northeast of new york city. the death toll at the sandy hook elementary school stands at 26, including 20 children, some of them kindergarteners. and the principal of the school was killed as well. the gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, armed with two handguns, opened fire in the kindergarten classroom where his mother was a teacher. her body was found later at her home. after the shootings, the police say adam lanza took his own life at the school. jim axelrod tells us how it all unfolded. jim? >> reporter: well, scott, it was just before -- just after 9:00 this morning at the sandy hook elementary school, which is right down the road here, a kindergarten through fourth grade school, so early this kids were still delivering their attendance list from their classrooms to the main office. as we say, a little after 9:00, the gunman apparently walked into the school and started shooting. police got 911 calls and kids could hear screaming coming over the intercom. the school was quickly placed on lockdown. teachers locking doors, pulling shades, keeping kids away from
. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the7 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those w
up in basically of state new york, west and new york. he came from very poor family. he did not have any formal education. his family moved around a lot. once he was out on his own he moved around a lot. he was a craftsman, a furniture maker and painter. never really get ahead. his life entirely change once he converted to mormon is and when he was a little bit more than 30 years old. >> added that happen? how did he meet his of smith? >> he first met the book of mormon. missionaries brought in shortly after it was published in 1830. some of his family's read it. he's been a long time thinking about it. he did not jump on board ran away. he was a little bit skeptical, uncertain. he spent a couple of years considering the claims that this new bible, this new work of scripture. then he encountered a group of traveling mormon elders or missionaries, and he saw them speak in tongues, something that he had not encountered to that point in his life, and he took that as a clear sign of god's power, that god's power was with this new church. shortly after that he baptized, becomes a member o
the giants share a deep history with new york and our prayers go out to everyone on the east coast affected by this disaster and the red cross in those regions they really need our help everybody and we encourage you to donate for the relief fund at red cross .org and the giants players are going to make donations and the giants' organization is going to match the donations by the employers. just think everybody here today and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joi
with a source close to them. she's live in our studios in new york and good evening to you. >> good evening. as we've been saying for the first three hours of reporting on this story today, we were being told by authorities a man in his 20s named ryan lanza was the shooter and was dead. tonight, of course, we know and have told you his younger brother, adam, is the one who is dead, suspected of carrying out the massacre, wearing his older brother's identification. but we also know that original suspect, ryan lanza, has been in custody for much of the derek being questioned in hoboken, new jersey. officials believe ryan lanza is cooperating and not believed to have been involved in the rampage. fox news has confirmed ryan lanza has a facebook page. it is active. we're not showing it here. but it lists him from newtown, connecticut, and living in hoboken. it caught our attention today when he or someone else on his behalf began leaving messages on-line via twitter about ryan lanza not being the shooter and saying his facebook page showed a man who had not done the horrible thing in connecticu
, young people live here, often work in new york city. ryan lanza, 24, we don't know a whole lot about him. we believe he's is custody but not, not apparently the shooter as had been reported for a long time today. ashley? >> it will be devastating for that family undoubtedly. john berman live in hoe boke 10 for us. obviously as this started to transpire alarm bells went off throughout the district here. the entire school district went into lockdown. the reaction was swift and the actions of teachers throughout this district were serious. renee burn is one of these teachers, she's a kindergarten teachers' aide, holly elementary school, and she knew some of the teachers at sandy hook elementary as well. her school was in lockdown a couple of hours following the shooting. renee, thank you for talking to us. take me inside your school and tell me how this day unfolded for you and when you ultimately found out why you were in lockdown. >> it started out as a normal day. we had our hol lay party scheduled for our kindergarten class which was scheduled to start about 10:15. and about 9:45, we he
of new york, the fact that we cannot pass sensible gun control in this congress is a blot on her reputation. and congressmen jerry nadler saying that now is not the time to have a serious discussion about and control, if not now, when would it be? at least 20 members of congress reacting with calls to restrict constitutional rights to bear arms. all over those calls coming from members of the democratic party. here is the number who chose to talk about mental illness. the disaffection of the mentally disturbed and ill. the importance of a strong family and how better to protect our schools, the burnable and helpless children with in those classrooms. those who threaten the safety of her children while at school. we begin with a september 11, murder of four americans in benghazi. susan rice yesterday withdrew her name from consideration to be secretary of state. the move comes after weeks of criticism over comments that she made regarding the attack in benghazi, and an interview with brian williams, ambassador rice was asked if she was blameless for the controversy. >> i don't thi
for a little spending. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> well, if you driving to the mall, you are paying a lot less for gas, pump prices are plunging dropping seven and a half percent in november. the national average for gasoline is now $3.30 a gallon. >> and that is the main reason consumer prices were down last month. the index of consumer prices which includes everything from the cost of milk to the price of a haircut fell three-tenths of a percent, that is the largest drop since may. >> but here on wall street investors ignored that up beat news and were fixated on the stalled talks in washington about the fiscal cliff. >> the dow lost 36 points, the nasdaq down 21, the s and b 500 fell, s&p fell also. >> looking at the outlook for gas and oil prices, we turn to an oil analyst, founding partner at again capital. >> you know, john, i was thinking looking over these numbers a few weeks ago here in the northeast we were paying close to $5 a gallonor gasoline, of course it was because of hurricane sandy and standing in line, gas lines, and now this. i know it is a special situation, but
is former new york city detective john bassa. and first of all, i want to talk to you about the young man, but the crime scene itself and we heard from the police lieutenant at the top of the hour talking about the crime scene still being very active. we know that the victims are still inside the school. as far as we know. first of all, why must they be left in there for so long and not returned to their loved ones and what's going on now as far as the collection of evidence? >> well, right now, they have to -- you know, they're going to have to identify some of the victims. they're still going to have to be taking photographs, now, be collecting evidence, but with -- as far as the bodies of the children, they're going to need to identify them first before they take them out to the medical examiner's office. >> rick: we've actually heard within the last hour or so, that all the victims have in fact been identified and that's new information that's come over recently, detective. but as we take a look at the work that still lies ahead for the investigators, what do they have to do? >> well,
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